What happens after the “likes”?-A guide to successful digital marketing

When pitching for business, one of the questions I usually get from clients is “how many likes can you get us on Facebook? In trying to explain that the effectiveness of a campaign/promotion can be measured in various ways, most clients tend to assume that if you cannot assure them of a reasonable number of likes, the campaign is not successful.

One of the elements of digital marketing which makes it difficult for business people to understand is the difficulty with measuring ROI or defining what the KPIs may be. I have seen campaigns where there were millions of impressions but less than 2% of leads. If the clients in this case defined the effectiveness by the number of impressions, then the campaign was successful. But if the real need was leads, then the campaign has failed woefully.

In many cases, digital marketers have been able to get a desired number of likes on Facebook or followers on Twitter for their clients/companies and this can be a great opportunity for brand marketing. However, in many cases, very few clients are ready to consider the question “what happens after they like us?-or follow us?” Continue reading

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Facebook/Instagram deal; signs of a dotcom bubble?

The tech and business world went crazy at the news of Facebook buying photo sharing app Instagram for 1billion dollars. One of the questions on most minds (expressed or otherwise) was; “is Instagram really worth that much?”  For some, it was “why Facebook?”

As I watched a TV programme discussing the deal this morning, some were of the opinion that we are about to experience a bubble like that of the millennium 2000.

Silicon Valley has had a history of finding money where most people can’t see it and if there’s any one person who will understand the “disruption” model of building a business, it has to be Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg himself.

So the questions we keep hearing are:

  • Was the app overpriced?
  • Is there a dotcom bubble?
  • Was it a wise move for Facebook?

Reports show that many Instagram fans are not exactly thrilled at the news of the deal as some have privacy concerns. Others believe it may become to “Facebook-ey” and eventually ruined.

I can’t say I’m particularly miffed as I don’t use Instagram and this kind of deal had to come at one point or the other.

So… was $1billion dollars too much?

I don’t think so; Instagram has a large number of very loyal fans who use it very much. There really is no telling how big it may grow. With that database of users and information, improvement comes easier (like a barrier to entry). 

Was it a wise move for Facebook?

With a platform like Facebook, I think Instagram is likely to be complimentary. Of course like everyone else, I am hoping it won’t lose its addictiveness after this deal.

Is there a dotcom bubble? Again?   

It’s very likely although the lines are blurry right now. Some products seem to have incredible value and some just appear like products of over-active imaginations which will not go far.  More than ever, investors need to keep an eye out for what would be a wise move looking back. But that has always been the riddle, hasn’t it?